Budgeting Your Money When You Own A Home Based Business

One of the most difficult things to do when you start a new Home Based Business is putting together a budget. Without any financial history on which to base income and expenses, it may seem like guesswork, but as part of any Home Based Business plan a tentative budget can be established with some thought and anticipation for the future.

In most Home Based Business there are two main categories, income and expense. Under your expense category there can be several sub-categories often falling into two main areas of controllable expenses and uncontrollable. While many Home Based Business owner claim they can control every expense involved in their Home Based Business, they are simply kidding themselves as some things such as utility cost, the amount of rent and other so-called fixed costs can, and do change, with the owner having no control.

Other expenses in Home Based Business such as payroll, insurance and advertising can be subject to a budget, but they are considered controllable expenses. If the Home Based Business begins to fall off, you can control some of these expenses by laying off employees and cutting back on advertising. However, living by a budget will help maintain profitability in many respects but can also turn against you in the long run.

Depending on the viability of your Home Based Business it often is a better investment to bite the financial bullet on employee wages and still provide good customer service to the remaining customers until Home Based Business picks back up. By trying to everything yourself not only will you burn out quickly, but is no one is taking care of the customers, it will not take long until there are no more customers to care for.

There are two ways to budget your Home Based Business money and that is through set dollar amounts and percentage of income. Many Home Based Business will budget their controllable expenses by the dollar and non-controllable by percentage of income. Obviously a good part of the owner’s time is going to be based on bringing money into the Home Based Business and how much they have to spend on controllable expenses will be in direct relation to income.

For example, a company earning $20,000 a month in income has budgeted six percent for payroll, providing $1,200 for payroll. If the income level rises to $50,000 the budgeted payroll percent does not change but the dollars available for payroll climbs to $3,000. With an obvious increase in Home Based Business to create the additional income, the owner will probably need the extra help to take care of Home Based Business.

There are many other expenses that fall into the payroll account such as worker’s compensation charges, Social Security tax paid by the employer and paid vacation time or other perks determined by the employer. While a budget may be difficult to establish for a new Home Based Business, it is a necessary evil for all Home Based Business owners.

Items That A Home Based Life Coach Can Deduct At Tax Time

Below are 19 common deductions for someone working from home (as over 90% of coaches do).

Working from home has many advantages. For one you are able to organizing and arrange your time based on what works best for you and your family. If you work best in the morning then you are able to schedule your most important calls and computer work then, observing a more relaxed schedule in the afternoons.

Have fun and enjoy spending your income on deductible related expenses. I like to spend my money on coaching and life improvement or success books, and on coach training materials or programs.

Keep track of your receipts and easily enter the numbers into your accounting books. After you have entered it in, mark the receipt as “entered” and store it in an appropriately labeled envelope. (“June Outgoing” for example.)

As a coach working from home, what can I deduct?

1. A portion of air conditioning, electricity, heat, and water.
2. A portion of your house insurance or renters insurance.
3. A portion of your rent or mortgage can be deductible if you have a space that is dedicated to the use of your home office.
4. Bank account, check cashing and check replacement fees.
5. Books related to coaching, life change, marketing, business, taxes, bookkeeping, success, self help, weight loss, health, psychology.
6. Cleaning supplies. This includes waste baskets, cloths, and floor cleaners etc.
7. Computer parts/ supplies.
8. Salaries: general employees, assistants, secretaries, receptionists, accountants, bookkeepers.
9. Interest on any business related borrowing you did, though for a home coaching business it is rarely necessary to borrow to start your business. This would include credit card interest as well.
10. Internet.
11. Mail related items: stamps, envelopes, gas used to mail the letter.
12. Maintenance and repairs including waste and snow removal.
13. Office furniture.
14. Office supplies.
15. Phone.
16. Printer parts/ supplies.
17. Security system.
18. Software.
19. Training. (Coaching or business related.)