Avoiding pitfalls with a property closing on a bank owned house

You’ve gotten a good lead on a particular property. You’ve called the homeowner and the prospect seems encouraging. You inspect the house, like what you see, and make an offer. Now the real test begins.

It may seem like a simple process to move from the final offer to the property closing. However, there are a number of steps you’ll have to follow along the way. Miss a step and you could seriously jeopardize your deal-and lose a great house in the process.

In the best case scenario with a bank-owned house, you will receive a call from the realtor saying that the offer has been accepted. The realtor will then need earnest money, which usually amounts to $500 or $1,000. You then add your addendum and the final package is then sent to the asset manager.

The realtor will normally get back to you immediately-either the same day or one or two days afterward. Then, you move onto the paperwork. You’ll be waiting to find out if the package has been signed by the originator of the loan. Then, a closing date will be set.

You will work with private lenders to have money sent to the closing table. The money will be sent via wire or bank check-not a personal check. You will need the routing number from the title agency so you can tell the private lender where to send the money to. Then, you work with your insurance company to set up hazard insurance. Obviously, you will need to know what your payments are going to be.

At the closing, you will be able to do the final signing over of the deed. This is a critical point in the home buying process. You pass out the checks and then you will receive the promissory note and the mortgage. You can then send the promissory note to the private lender.

Finally, the route from offer to closing is not always smooth. You can run into some bumps along the way. But if you are careful to take care of details, you communicate with all the people involved in the process, and you steer toward your goal, you can end up with a deal that you’re happy with. And you can build a successful real estate business of buying and selling property to tenant buyers who are eager to have a home to call their own.

The Risks Of Hiring A House Painter Without Insurance In Jacksonville, Florida

As a home owner you are continually making decisions about the appearance and maintenance of your home. This goes to a whole new level when it comes time for major home projects like painting the interior or exterior.

These days we have to look to get the best deal possible. Certainly, no one can be faulted for searching out lower prices whenever possible. The key, however, is to understand that what looks like a great deal may well end up being far more expensive. The best deal is often not the least expensive. This is especially important to keep in mind when choosing a professional painter to do work on your home.

Everyone knows a guy who will paint your house, top to bottom, for half the price of a professional painting contractor. Despite how easy it is to understand the extra motivation to cut costs that has been created by the current economic downturn, this kind of corner-cutting should be considered very carefully.

Even if you make sure quality paint and materials are selected and you personally go to extents to cover furniture and protect against drips and spills, one of the key differences between a professional painter and someone who works outside the system are the risks of hiring a house painter who doesn’t have insurance. The licensed painting professional will carry both liability and workers compensation insurance to protect you both.

Liability insurance will protect you against any damage that could be done to your home, such as a falling extension ladder breaking a window or dropped paint requiring the replacement of your flooring. Workers compensation insurance covers injuries that may happen to their workers while they are on your property. When you hire someone who is without insurance, you will almost likely bear the expense and cost for anything that goes wrong.

The responsible house painter owner who carries the necessary insurance coverage to protect his clients and his employees, pays all the appropriate taxes and provides a decent wage, will always be at a disadvantage when it comes to bidding for your home painting project. The decision is up to you, the homeowner, and how you define value. One piece of advice that it might be beneficial to keep in mind is that old saying that you get what you pay for.