Avoiding pitfalls with a property closing on a bank owned house

You’ve gotten a good lead on a particular property. You’ve called the homeowner and the prospect seems encouraging. You inspect the house, like what you see, and make an offer. Now the real test begins.

It may seem like a simple process to move from the final offer to the property closing. However, there are a number of steps you’ll have to follow along the way. Miss a step and you could seriously jeopardize your deal-and lose a great house in the process.

In the best case scenario with a bank-owned house, you will receive a call from the realtor saying that the offer has been accepted. The realtor will then need earnest money, which usually amounts to $500 or $1,000. You then add your addendum and the final package is then sent to the asset manager.

The realtor will normally get back to you immediately-either the same day or one or two days afterward. Then, you move onto the paperwork. You’ll be waiting to find out if the package has been signed by the originator of the loan. Then, a closing date will be set.

You will work with private lenders to have money sent to the closing table. The money will be sent via wire or bank check-not a personal check. You will need the routing number from the title agency so you can tell the private lender where to send the money to. Then, you work with your insurance company to set up hazard insurance. Obviously, you will need to know what your payments are going to be.

At the closing, you will be able to do the final signing over of the deed. This is a critical point in the home buying process. You pass out the checks and then you will receive the promissory note and the mortgage. You can then send the promissory note to the private lender.

Finally, the route from offer to closing is not always smooth. You can run into some bumps along the way. But if you are careful to take care of details, you communicate with all the people involved in the process, and you steer toward your goal, you can end up with a deal that you’re happy with. And you can build a successful real estate business of buying and selling property to tenant buyers who are eager to have a home to call their own.

Identifying Common Bank Owned Auctions Pitfalls

Houses that are sold through bank owned auctions can provide an investor or a regular homebuyer with a good deal; that is, if they knew what they are doing and are aware of the possible pitfalls commonly associated with such deals.

Potential Benefits to Buyers

Most property lenders or banks that auction off properties are more willing to offer them at fair market values, unlike when a home is sold as an REO property. Auctions are also clear on the closing date, which eliminates buyer worries regarding how much time they have until they can no longer bid on the property.

Majority of auctions also have due diligence provisions of comprehensive details on the house being sold. If the buyer has conducted his or her own research on the property, they can use these details to compare information and find out more about the property they are trying to purchase.

Auctions also eliminate the problem of worrying about unexpected competition after the deal has been sealed, even from bidders who can make better offers, since once the auction is done and the winning bidder has been announced, that bidder automatically owns the property.

The Not So Good Aspect of Auction

Homes under bank owned auctions are not exempted from problems of eviction. This means that it is also possible for an auctioned property to be still occupied by the former owners. Sometimes, former owners try to get back at their lenders by thrashing the place, effectively increasing the expenses of the buyer since he or she would need to take care of the repairs.

The winning bidder in an auction is also required to put down the money for the property in cashier’s check or in cash the moment he or she won the bidding war. For auction bidders, it is necessary to attend auction events armed with cash that is at least equivalent to the amount of bid that he or she is going to put down for a property.

There are some good things about buying properties at bank owned auctions, although there are also the usual problems. The best thing for a buyer to do is to research a property that he or she would like to bid on and to hire a professional agent to help in evaluating the worth of the house.